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Western Conference Championship 2016 Game 7

May 31, 2016
by

Bruce and Kareem

Bruce and Kareem Small Ball

We all know how that fight turned out.

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7 Comments
  1. May 31, 2016 12:57 am

    I was tempted to photoshop faces, but the fact is, theirs is “Strength in Numbers” (and I could never disrespect Bruce or Kareem that way). There was no Warrior who single-handedly dominated the game. There were outstanding performances and clutch plays by almost all of them. Ezeli excepted. The second exception was Curry’s Q2 buzzer beater lay-up through 4 deer-in-the-headlights Thunder – which was double clutching.

    More random thoughts in no particular order:

    Moving Iggy off the bench was huge.

    You could see the Thunder pointing the finger at each other. That is always going to get beat by a team with similar talent that instead encourages each other.

    “Steph told me before I went out in the fourth [Game 6], `This is your time,”‘ Thompson said. “`You know, put on a show out there and have fun.’ I took those words to heart, and I just tried to be aggressive.”

    Sounds like leadership to me.

    The entire first half the Warriors couldn’t buy an offensive rebound. Then, the middle of the fourth when they kept missing their layups! I just about turned inside out.

    For this series, at least, Small Ball and the Three win.

    “Curry over Durant….THREEEEEEEE!!!!!”

    Now, back to my Koolaid.

    EDIT: I watched the whole game without checking the final score. Was hard, especially for the first half.

  2. May 31, 2016 1:04 am

    More thoughts. They dodged a bullet. Crying wolf, or being Casey at bat will eventually circle back to haunt you. They passed a true test (last year’s Grizzlies and Rockets, and hobbled Cavs didn’t provide that). Now, one more real and final test starting on Thursday.

    But, as a fan, I don’t care anymore. I really needed them to win this championship to prove themselves. Now, it is more just, do they have the stamina? They have the talent and the heart (only 10 of 233 teams have won being 3 games down – that is special company). Do they have the stamina? (EDIT: By stamina I mean going the distance.)

    EDIT: When Iggy and Green join Curry, they effectively have three point guards on the floor (if I am understanding what I am seeing).

  3. May 31, 2016 5:26 pm

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/01/sports/basketball/the-case-for-kevin-durants-staying-with-the-thunder.html

    KD was congratulating Curry after the game like, “Hey, make room for me. I’m comin’ over.” No, I don’t know. But was a very cool exchange between to MVPs who fought each other so hard.

  4. May 31, 2016 7:04 pm

    Oh I’m done with the way the games are covered. The Warriors get blown out twice, escape two late game runs by OKC, and the game 6 implosion by OKC, and somehow there’s articles out there by how they took the series. How dominant they were, blah blah.

    Before that Ibaka foul the crowd was really quiet. But they imploded once more and they weren’t even guarding or fouling anyone. Then it’s all Steph Curry runs the clock and makes a three. Dude, OKC wanted to get out of the building after the foul.

    But hey let’s chalk it up to the greatest ever.

    • May 31, 2016 7:08 pm

      Also Draymond Green kicks a bunch of times in different games after the “suspension” scare and never gets covered by the media. never gets suspended. There is a loud conspiracy theory going on. Especially after the NBA facebook page listed the Warriors against Cavs days before.

  5. May 31, 2016 10:45 pm

    Frenik, come here for reasonable discussion. Feel free to vent.

    I just rechecked that article and noticed the use of “dominant”. My apologies. I agree completely that the Warriors did NOT dominate in this series. Like most of their wins all season, it was a matter of “dominating” for a few minutes, or to be very zen about it – they are good at cutting around the bone – of taking advantage of a small, brief weaknesses to incredible effect. They are explosive, and very effective from way outside the arc, (and Curry has mad ball handling skill) but I agree completely that they didn’t dominate.

    This was a very sloppy series, it wasn’t won so much as it was lost. It was lost more by who was going to play the poorest at the most inopportune time, than won by any super-duper team. For this series, it was the Thunder who played poorly at the most crucial times. They have been practicing losing 4th quarter leads all season (just as both teams have been practicing turning over the ball). The Warriors, on the other hand, have been practicing pulling games out of the fire all season – “stealing” victories from opponents when all hope was lost.

    No doubt the NBA wants a record-breaking championship team out there, and they will do all they can do to increase the hype. After all, if the Warriors are just some random team running for the Championship, what is the big deal? If, however, they are one of the best ever, wow, we better check it out! That is the NBA thinking on it. As Kenny said in party chat, they are there to make money above all else. Yes, “greatest ever” has no place in the same paragraphs as “Warriors” until they win at least a couple more Championships.

    The reffing was as it is and always has been – done by humans with lots of mistakes. I didn’t see any more mistakes that favored the Warriors than the Thunder. I never even mentioned that Westbrook travel which killed a crucial opportunity of the Warriors winning that important first game. As for Green, he will almost certainly get his critical foul that will put him out of a game, just when it may be even more important than it was in that previous series. As a fan of the team, and for the reasons I like the Warriors, his methods have been most unimpressive to me. Rewatching the highlights from the Cavs/Warriors games earlier in the season, he looks like a different player. Weird, but I don’t know if it is my diminished respect for him as a flopper/dirty player, or if his play style has actually gone in the crapper. His threes certainly have. Every time he lobbed one up I wanted to slap his face. How dare you take the shot when you should be passing that shit around to Thompson.

    One thing you and I probably disagree on, however, is the skill of the team led by Curry and Thompson. Curry was proving it all year – he was clutch on countless occasions, and he is far, far more than just a “pure shooter” (if that means that all he can do is shoot). In game 7, he ran figure-eights through all the Thunder and then still either shot it or laid it in. Both he and Thompson got most of their threes over some of the tallest players in the game – Durant and the Adams. Most NBA pros can’t even get those shots uncontested. They were doing it over people almost a foot taller than them. Also, for the times they weren’t covered, many times it’s because they don’t stop running (at least, for the games for which they showed up). They make the opportunities and they have the ability to shoot before people can get set up. They earned their accolades – and their records.

    • June 1, 2016 12:04 am

      To clarify, the reason I linked that article was the Durant side of things, and his quote at the end.

      “They beat us from the 3-point line,” Durant said. “We beat them everywhere else. They beat us from the 3-point line, and that was the series.”

      From my perspective, the three is demoralizing. It is devastating in points being 50% more than a regular shot, and it bypasses all means of defense, especially when contested. That is one thing I haven’t read about anywhere, but I think is a huge part of the Warriors brief, “explosive” success. And the Warriors have the most and the best 3 point shooters in the league (and that statement can probably be extended to cover the most of the history of the NBA).

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